Weight Lifting Power Racks





Weight Lifting Power Racks

If you are going to lift weights alone, the power rack is the safest tool. Although it is often associated with advanced training methods and exercises, the power rack is not just an advanced tool. Power racks and half racks have adjustable height “safeties” that catch the weights should your strength fail on a rep. This enables you to push yourself to failure, meaning you can train harder alone and not be dependent on anyone, should difficulty be encountered. Of course a buddy or spotter is useful to help push you harder still by allowing negatives and forced-reps, but these techniques are best employed when you are struggling to add weight to the bar, but even then, there are other ways around a sticking point. Both the power rack and the half rack can usually handle more weight than the strongest men.

The power rack is safer than the half rack in that the safeties are longer and supported at each end. A power rack tends to be more stable and many come with a chinning bar fixed at the top. Many power racks also offer the ability to bolt on a “lat attachment” with a high pulley for pull-downs and pushdowns and a low pulley for cable rows, and curls (though I prefer to do curls with an Olympic EZ bar). Some half racks feature a “gun rack” which acts just like the hooks of a power rack, but it means that you can conveniently “walk” a loaded bar up or down, saving you time unloading and re-loading the bar, so it’s good for people in a rush. For both racks you’ll need a 7-foot Olympic bar as these racks are wide.

Although half racks tend to be a little cheaper, the power rack offers much more flexibility as they tend to be higher and the safeties can be positioned quite high, or, quite low. This means that an exercise can be broken into components to eliminate a sticking point, such as the overhead press (or shoulder press) and the range of motion can be reduced, such as the deadlift.

For some power racks (Powertec and Body Solid) you can also buy dip handles. I didn’t like the design of the Body Solid one, and as I had a couple of spare standard 6 foot bars, I made my own dip station. I also needed some wood and racing bike handle-bar tape – see the picture below for my set-up.


Burn the Fat Feed the Muscle
Burn the Fat
Feed the Muscle


Muscle Gaining Secrets
Muscle Gaining Secrets